Fighting For A Fix: Reflections Of Mothers Who Lost Children To The Opioid Epidemic

CixmJ1VXAAAY9DbThe number of drug-related deaths is rising in the United States. Each year, more people are dying from overdoses than car accidents, and more than half of overdoses involve opioids, such as heroin and prescription painkillers.

Addiction has no face; its victims may be your neighbors, your teammates, your friends. Many become addicted from a physician’s prescription; others from one poor choice. Addiction recovery programs are too few and ineffective, while stigmas and pharmaceutical profitability impede reform.

In “Fighting For A Fix,” I tell the stories of seven mothers who lost a son or daughter to this epidemic. These women are crying out for change—to the pharmaceutical industry, to treatment programs and to stigmas. Amid their sadness, hope endures.

Now available for purchase on Amazon.com.

Advertisements

Ah, The ‘F’ Word (No, Not That One)

Failure, the opposite of the “s” word (no, not that one). It comes and goes, bringing you down when you least expect it, complicating your overly drawn-out workday. The only way to overcome this psychologically harmful concept is to free yourself from the fear of failure.

We all fail every day, even when these shortcomings are on a smaller scale. Wake up late for work? That’s a failure. Forget to iron your dress shirt? That’s a failure. Didn’t take into account morning traffic before driving your children to school? That’s a failure.

What’s important is that we learn from our failures, instead of dwelling on them, allowing us to become stronger, both mentally and physically. Failing encourages us to push for a better tomorrow, and, in return, giving us what we need to thrive and work toward more successes.

And You Are?

Sometimes we get a little ahead of ourselves (damn idiomatic phrases). Receiving a new assignment from a client is always exciting news; it means a bill can be paid. Jumping the gun (another fail) may lead to unnecessary challenges ahead.

This sounds basic, but we must always think about the individual we’re reaching out to when inquiring about a particular topic. Do they know who you are? Do they know the publication you’re working with? Keep your image the same across all platforms to provide the entire story to the interviewee. Think about yourself in their situation: Wouldn’t you be a bit skeptical after receiving an email from someone or a brand you’re not familiar with?

Present the facts in the beginning to ease their worries. Ask them if they have any questions, and be more than willing to answer their concerns. Following this approach will surely limit the chances of any clouds on the horizon (sigh) from arising.

 

NEW Forbes Ebook Available This Month

Many of you may or may not know, but I’ve been working on an eBook about our country’s opioid epidemic. Available at the end of this month on Amazon, “Fighting For A Fix: Reflections of Mothers Who Lost Children To The Opioid Epidemic” retells the stories of mothers who’ve lost children to opioid-related overdoses.

Feedback Is Your Friend

Whether it’s good or bad, feedback is your friend. It should always be taken into consideration before moving onto your next project. Soliciting feedback from both clients and editors will not only bring your writing to another level, but it will help you grow as the leader of your business.

While positive feedback encourages and boots your confidence, negative feedback reinforces the idea of not being perfect and confirms the belief of continuing education. Without both, your writing suffers and keeps you shielded from criticisms from the world around you.